Provisional indicative world plan for agricultural development
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Provisional indicative world plan for agricultural development a synthesis and analysis of factors relevant to world, regional and national agricultural development. by Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

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Published in Rome .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Developing countries.

Subjects:

  • Agriculture and state -- Developing countries

Book details:

Classifications
LC ClassificationsHD1417 .F64
The Physical Object
Pagination2 v.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5729953M
LC Control Number70508195

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Provisional indicative world plan for agricultural development; a synthesis and analysis of factors relevant to world, regional and national agricultural development. Indicative world plan for agricultural development to and - Provisional regional study no 2, South America vol 2, explanatory notes and statistical tables. Book Review:Provisional Indicative World Plan for Agricultural Development Food and Agriculture Orga January Economic Development and Cultural Change Vernon W. RuttanAuthor: Nigel Faithfull. Other articles where An Indicative World Plan for Agricultural Development is discussed: Food and Agriculture Organization: In the organization published An Indicative World Plan for Agricultural Development, which analyzed the main problems in world agriculture and suggested strategies for solving them. The World Food Conference, held in Rome during a period of food shortages in the. Publishing History This is a chart to show the when this publisher published books. Along the X axis is time, and on the y axis is the count of editions published. Click here to skip the chart.

Book Review:Provisional Indicative World Plan for Agricultural Development Food and Agriculture Orga January Economic Development and Cultural Change Vernon W. RuttanAuthor: Wendy Yoder. International Development and Food Assistance Act of Hearings and Markup of the Committee on International Relations, House of Representatives, Ninety-fourth Congress, First Session, on Proposed Legislation to Amend the Foreign Assistance Act of , and for Other Purposes (House Document No. and H.R. ). 15 United Nations, FAO, Provisional Indicative World Plan for Agricultural Development, Vol. 1, p. 16 These percentages are even higher if France is included Cited by: World agriculture: towards An FAO study. Chichester, UK, John Wiley and Rome, FAO. Alexandratos, N. China’s projected cereals deficits in a world context. Agricultural Economics, Alexandratos, N. China’s projected cereals consumption and the capacity of the rest of the world to increase exports. Food Policy, June.

A Short History of Agricultural Development Over the past years, nearly every part of the developed world has seen an agricultural transformation. As farming improved, so did incomes, health, and economies. More recently, we’ve seen amazing progress in parts of the developing world. During the Green Revolution, whichFile Size: 2MB. 3. Development of Agricultural Framework Plans and Spatial Development Plans for the two Agricultural Regions that make up the Rural ABM area. The status quo confirmed the potential for agricultural development and served as the basis for the development of the Agricultural Policy and the Agricultural Development Frameworks for the. The food production potential of the world is decreasing every day. Ønce calculated from various data that we are losing at least 10 ha of arable land each minute (five because of soil erosion, three because of soil salinization, one because of non-agricultural use and one because of soil degradation).Cited by: Abstract. From the middle of the s to the beginning of the s, population in developing countries increased by nearly 50 per cent. About three-quarters of the cereal supply for this addition to population came from an expansion of the sown area; 2 only one-quarter was the result of higher crop yields. 3Cited by: 2.